Open-ended laboratory tests for cyclists could help athletes train better

Scientists have discovered that cyclists can perform better when they do not have to pace their efforts. Using 17 experienced male cyclists in a series of tests, they compared open-ended Time-To-Exhaustion (TTE) trials that are often used in laboratories with race-like Time-Trials to measure endurance performance. All of the cyclists were blinded to elapsed time, power output, cadence and heart rate.



Brain powered: Increased physical activity among breast cancer survivors boosts cognition

It is estimated that up to 75 percent of breast cancer survivors experience problems with cognitive difficulties following treatments, perhaps lasting years. Currently, few science-based options are available to help. Researchers report in a pilot study of 87 female breast cancer survivors an increase in physical activity more than doubled the women's post-treatment mental processing speed.



Treatment-resistant melanoma may be vulnerable to a drug holiday, study finds

A new study has uncovered the mechanisms by which treatment-resistant melanoma become vulnerable to cessation of a class of drugs called MAP kinase (MAPK)-targeted inhibitors. By identifying these mechanisms, the scientists discovered that therapeutic benefits for patients could derive from a one-two punch of a drug holiday of MAPK inhibitors followed by a class of drugs called DNA repair inhibitors.



New self-powered paper patch could help diabetics measure glucose during exercise

A new paper-based sensor patch developed by researchers at Binghamton University, State University of New York could allow diabetics to effectively measure glucose levels during exercise.



Decreased glucose metabolism in medial prefrontal areas is associated with nutritional status in patients with prodromal and early Alzheimer's disease

A new study shows that hypometabolism in the medial prefrontal areas is specifically associated with Alzheimer's disease-related nutritional problems, and decrease in fat mass may have a key role.



Older drivers who experience falls may be at a higher risk for car crashes

A team of researchers recently created a study to see whether falls were related to driving risks and behaviors among older adults.



Regular exercise, stress can both make a big difference in lupus, study finds

Waking up in the morning with the joint pain, swelling and stiffness that accompanies lupus doesn't exactly inspire a workout. But research in mice and a related pilot study in humans are showing how regular activity and stress reduction could lead to better health in the long run.



Type 2 diabetes is a reversible condition

People with type 2 diabetes can reverse the condition through a low calorie diet.



Asthma symptoms can be improved by diet and exercise in non-obese patients

Non-obese people with asthma could reduce their symptoms and improve their quality of life through diet and exercise, according to new research.



Why high-fiber diets do not always lead to weight loss

In the era of personalized nutrition, there might be value in getting your stool tested and your gut bacteria counted before starting on a new diet. The results can be used to predict whether a particular diet will work for you. This follows a study which shows that the increasingly popular fiber-rich 'New Nordic Diet' might not work for everyone.



Your stools reveal whether you can lose weight

Something as simple as a feces sample reveals whether you can lose weight by following dietary recommendations characterized by a high content of fruit, vegetables, fibers and whole grains, report scientists.



New research to treat acute malnutrition

Researchers and humanitarian organizations have conducted a large study in Burkina Faso in West Africa treating more than 1,600 children with acute malnutrition. The study showed that corn-soy porridge should be replaced with a lipid-based nutrient supplement, a fortified peanut butter. The results of the study can be used directly both in the treatment and prevention of acute malnutrition.



Small increases in physical activity reduce immobility, disability risks in older adults

Adding 48 minutes of exercise per week is associated with improvements in overall mobility and decreases in risks of disability in older adults who are sedentary, finds a new study.



Abdominal fat a key cancer driver for postmenopausal women

Body fat distribution in the trunk is more important than body weight when it comes to cancer risk in postmenopausal women, according to a new study.



What mediates the beneficial effects of exercise on breast cancer outcomes?

The ability of serum obtained from women with breast cancer immediately after finishing two hours of moderate to intense exercise to prevent the growth and survival of breast cancer cells lines in vitro and in mice was attributable, at least in part, to epinephrine activation of the Hippo signaling pathway.



Why it's difficult to predict evolutionary fate of a new trait

Scientists explain the vexing complexities that make it hard to predict whether a new genetic trait will take over a population or die out, a key challenge for many fields including infectious disease.



Later circadian timing of food intake is associated with increased body mass index

Investigators examine the relationships between body fat and body mass index, and the timing of food consumption, to time of day and to the body's circadian or body clock.



Eat fat, live longer?

As more people live into their 80s and 90s, researchers have delved into the issues of health and quality of life during aging. A recent mouse study sheds light on those questions by demonstrating that a high fat, or ketogenic, diet not only increases longevity, but improves physical strength.



Physical activity can lead to difference in diet preferences between males, females

Approximately 90 percent of adult Americans fail to reach the US Department of Health guidelines for physical activity, which could be contributing to surging obesity rates. Now, new research suggests that physical activity can change diet preferences in males, but not in females -- an area that researchers say has not been thoroughly studied.



Boosting a lipid fuel makes mice less sensitive to the cold

Humans, like other animals, become more sensitive to cold with age. Now, scientists report that delivering a single dose of a nutritional supplement called L-carnitine to older mice restores a youthful ability to adapt to the cold. After treatment, they tolerate chilly conditions that would ordinarily trigger hypothermia. The supplement works by boosting levels of a newly discovered fuel source for brown fat, or “good fat”.



Exercising during pregnancy is good for mother, baby, research confirms

Researchers have clarified doubts over the physical activity recommended during pregnancy. Their work highlights how exercise should be taken not only by healthy, previously active women, but that it is also a good time to adopt a healthy lifestyle. There are clear advantages for both the mother and baby.



Adipose tissue may affect cancer development in multiple ways

Adipose tissue, or fat, may influence the development of cancer in diverse ways, depending on the type of fat and the location in the body.



Slow walking pace is good predictor of heart-related deaths

Study suggests that middle-aged people who report that they are slow walkers could be at higher risk of heart disease compared to the general population.



Anti-inflammatory drugs can inhibit muscle growth

The long-term use of over-the-counter (OTC) anti-inflammatory drugs can inhibit muscle growth in young, healthy individuals engaging in weight training, according to a new study.



Automatic external defibrillators save lives in amateur sports and fitness centers

Automatic external defibrillators save lives in amateur sports and fitness centers, according to new research. The 18-year study found that survival from cardiac arrest reached 93 percent in centers equipped with an AED.

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