Physical activity could combat fatigue, cognitive decline in cancer survivors

A new study indicates that cancer patients and survivors have a ready weapon against fatigue and 'chemo brain': a brisk walk. Researchers looked at the association between physical activity, fatigue and performance on cognitive tasks in nearly 300 breast cancer survivors.



Good fighters are bad runners

For mice and men, a strength in one area of Darwinian fitness may mean a deficiency in another. A look at Olympic athletes shows that a wrestler is built much differently than a marathoner. It's long been supposed that strength in fighting, or protecting territory and resources, comes at the expense of running, or spatial mobility. Now an experiment with house mice provides evidence for this theory.



Why sugary drinks and protein-rich meals don't go well together

Having a sugar-sweetened drink with a high-protein meal may negatively affect energy balance, alter food preferences and cause the body to store more fat.



How physical exercise prevents dementia

Physical exercise seems beneficial in the prevention of cognitive impairment and dementia in old age, numerous studies have shown. Now researchers have explored in one of the first studies worldwide how exercise affects brain metabolism.



Perceiving oneself as less physically active than peers is linked to a shorter lifespan

American adults who believed that they were less active than their peers died younger than those who believed they were more active -- even if their actual activity levels were similar, research shows.



Moderate exercise and dieting reduces risk of Cesarean section and diabetes in pregnancy

Pregnant women who have a healthy diet and regular moderate exercise are less likely to have a caesarean section, gain excessive weight, or develop diabetes in pregnancy, according to a new study.



Gaining a few pounds may increase long-term heart failure risk

Modest weight gain over time may alter the structure and function of heart muscle, affecting long-term risk of heart failure. Researchers say maintaining weight and avoiding weight gain may be an important strategy to prevent changes in heart muscle that could lead to heart failure.



Personalized 'earable' sensor monitors body temperature in real time

Wireless, wearable sensors are all the rage with millions of people now sporting fitness trackers on their wrists. These devices can count footsteps, monitor heart rate and other vital signs. Now researchers report that they have developed a 3-D printed sensor worn on the ear that measures one of the most basic medical indicators of health in real time: core body temperature.



Obese patients don't need to lose weight before total joint replacement, study finds

There's good news for overweight people with painfully arthritic hips and knees: A new study finds that obese patients who underwent knee or hip replacement surgery reported virtually the same pain relief and improved function as normal-weight joint replacement patients six months after surgery.



New supplement can repair, rejuvenate muscles in older adults

Whey protein supplements aren't just for gym buffs according to new research. When taken on a regular basis, a combination of these and other ingredients in a ready-to-drink formula have been found to greatly improve the physical strength of a growing cohort: senior citizens.



Large-scale study of adaptation in yeast could help explain the evolution of cancer

A genome sequencing approach has been used to reveal the 'drivers' of adaptation in laboratory-evolved yeast. This work uncovers roles of genetic hitchhiking and interaction in determining which mutations succeed or fail in rapidly-evolving microbial population and may hold clues to the dynamics of cancer evolution.



Does exercise facilitate body weight control? The answer may depend on sex

Healthcare practitioners regularly prescribe diet and exercise as a method for patients to lose weight. But exercise might not be equally effective in males and females, according to new research. In a study conducted in rats, researchers fed both male and female rats a high fat diet and then trained half of them to run on a treadmill.



Estrogen in the brain prevents obesity and glucose intolerance during menopause in lab animal study

Researchers have found that adding estrogen in the brain may improve health in obese females after menopause.



Benefits of gastric bypass surgery linked to changes in sweet taste preference

Worldwide, the number of patients struggling with obesity is rapidly increasing in both adults and children. Diet and exercise are the mainstays of treatment for obesity, but have limited effectiveness. While bariatric surgery can produce sustained and significant weight loss for most patients, not all patients experience similar benefits.



One minute of running per day associated with better bone health in women

A single minute of exercise each day is linked to better bone health in women, new research shows.



A prescription of activities shown to improve health and well-being

Gyms, walking groups, gardening, cooking clubs and volunteering have all been shown to work in improving the health and well-being reported by a group of people with long-term conditions. Key to the success was a 'Link Worker' who helped participants select their activity and supported them throughout the program.



Not all muscle building supplements are equal

Popular muscle building supplements, known as branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) are ineffective when taken in isolation, according to new research.



Soccer boosts bone development in boys

Playing soccer can improve bone development in adolescent boys, new research shows. In a study comparing adolescent soccer players to swimmers, cyclists and a control group of boys not involved in regular sport, scientists found soccer led to significantly better bones after one year of training.



Cancer survivors get a taste for kefir after exercise

Kefir may be a beneficial post-exercise beverage for cancer survivors. It means that cancer survivors can enjoy the nutritional support that milk provides without the potential for significant stomach upset, report researchers.



Why strength depends on more than muscle

Physical strength might stem as much from exercising the nervous system as the muscles it controls. The findings could explain why those who lift heavier weights enjoy greater strength gains than low-load lifters despite similar growth in muscle mass.



Fasting blood sugar, fasting insulin identified as new biomarkers for weight loss

A personalized diet approach could lead to greater weight loss and maintenance success, report researchers. Their study identifies fasting blood sugar and/or fasting insulin as new biomarkers for weight loss in people with prediabetes or diabetes.



Conversation cards© a useful tool in pediatric weight management

Conversation Cards© were developed to help families think about and prioritize key challenges regarding pediatric weight management. They also create points of reference for providers, which could help to create treatment plans for families based on their priorities. Using Conversation Cards©, researchers conducted a study that reviewed the way families use the cards and how their card selections aligned with family characteristics.



Anti-gravity treadmills get patients running again after knee surgery

Using space age technology, an expert on knee rehabilitation works with clients who have been given the all clear to start to return to sporting activities but may have concerns about moving from being a patient with an injury to being an athlete again.



Smelling your food makes you fat

Researchers developed ways to temporarily eliminate the sense of smell in adult mice, and discovered that those mice that lost smell could eat a high-fat diet and stay a normal weight, while littermates that retained the sense of smell ballooned to twice normal weight. Supersmellers gained more weight than did normal mice on the same high-fat diet. Smell-deficient mice burned excess fat instead of storing it, suggesting a link between smell and metabolism.



Sport feels less strenuous if you believe it's doing you good

"Sport is too much like hard work." For many, that is reason enough to pass when it comes to exercise. But does sport really have to make you break into a sweat? Psychologists have discovered that one's own expectations have a major influence on just how strenuous one perceives a unit of sport to be.

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