Study of nearly 300,000 people challenges the 'obesity paradox'

The idea that it might be possible to be overweight or obese but not at increased risk of heart disease, otherwise known as the 'obesity paradox', has been challenged by a study of nearly 300,000 people. The research shows that the risk of heart and blood vessel problems, such as heart attacks, strokes and high blood pressure, increases as body mass index (BMI) increases beyond a BMI of 22-23 kg/m2., coPXafUzqRA

Virtual coaches, fitness trackers help patients stay fit after cardiac rehab

A 12-week mobile health, or mHealth, program not only kept cardiac rehab patients from losing ground, it appeared to help them maintain and even gain fitness., cKMZzOZ eoE

Physically fit women nearly 90 percent less likely to develop dementia

Women with high physical fitness at middle age were nearly 90 percent less likely to develop dementia decades later, compared to women who were moderately fit, according to a new study. The study measured the women's cardiovascular fitness based on an exercise test., 5dgV P3c3To

Can we turn back time? Muscles' own protective systems could help reduce frailty

New research published today helps explain why people experience muscle loss in old age, increasing the prospects of reversing the condition in the future., vMUtJ6tB1p8

Caloric restriction in combination with low-fat diet helps protect aging mouse brains

New research finds that a low-fat diet in combination with limited caloric consumption prevents aging-induced inflammatory activation of immune cells in the mouse brain - and that exercise is significantly less effective than caloric restriction in preventing these age-related changes. This indicates that the fat content of a diet, as well as caloric intake, are important parameters for the detrimental effects of aging on the brain., i7QenWtX51g

Exercise may decrease heart drug's effectiveness

Health care experts are quick to remind us that a healthy lifestyle includes regular exercise. But what if certain, potentially life-saving medications don't perform as well during exercise?, Ook01Kn8fpc

A lifetime of regular exercise slows down aging, study finds

A group of older people who have exercised all of their lives, were compared to a group of similarly aged adults and younger adults who do not exercise regularly. The results showed that those who have exercised regularly have defied the aging process, having the immunity, muscle mass, and cholesterol levels of a young person., NMsU6TMDWy8

Little difference among diet plans' long-term effectiveness

Whether you pick low-carb, low fat or another diet plan, scientific research indicates each can help some people achieve modest long-term weight loss with potential improvement in health risks, according to a statement on managing obesity.,  R45JZxWZ c

Scientists find power switch for muscles

If you've ever wondered how strenuous exercise translates into better endurance, researchers may now have your answer. Scientists have shown that the protein ERR? (ERR gamma) helps deliver many of the benefits associated with endurance exercise., kCVkhovtsbo

Gastric bypass surgery can give better control for diabetes and obesity than lifestyle modification

Patients treated with a form of bariatric surgery did significantly better than patients provided with an intensive diabetes and weight management program., czF2oQUVNRo

Training the dizziness away

Many people are plagued by dizziness. To date, doctors have had to visually use their best judgment to determine its severity. Now the innovativeĀ  EQUIVert system is here to provide objective diagnoses for the first time. EQUIVert offers another special feature: It enables patients to train their sense of balance anytime they wish -- safely, effectively and conveniently., U46UYkAWGeg

Regular walking may protect against heart failure post menopause

Walking for at least 40 minutes several times per week at an average to fast pace is associated with a near 25 percent drop in the risk of heart failure among post-menopausal women, according to new research. The benefit appears to be consistent regardless of a woman's body weight or whether she engages in other forms of exercise besides walking., 9Z0Kmhd2u3Q

Music boosts exercise time during cardiac stress testing

If you exercise while listening to music, you may have noticed it can help boost your energy and make your workout seem quicker. Similarly, a new study suggests listening to music during a standard cardiac stress test can help extend the time someone is able to perform the test, yielding important information about an individual's heart health and capacity for exercise., 3eh0R3 ZRGs

Fitness tracker data can enhance biomedical research and personalized health

Medical researchers show that wearable sensors are not only able to identify groups of volunteers with similar patterns of daily activity, but can also predict various markers of risk for cardiovascular diseases such as obesity, high blood pressure and high blood sugar., Y43h8LH na0

Stem cell study may result in stronger muscles in old age

As we grow older, our muscular function declines. A new study shows how an unexpectedly high number of mutations in the stem cells of muscles impair cell regeneration. This discovery may result in new medication to build stronger muscles even when in old age., TE H3vqgezA

Beetroot juice supplements may help certain heart failure patients

Beetroot juice supplements may help enhance exercise capacity in patients with heart failure, according to a new proof-of-concept study. Exercise capacity is a key factor linked to these patients' quality of life and even survival., H5NLgqAk M0

Watching too much television could cause fatal blood clots

Spending too much time in front of the television could increase your chance of developing potentially fatal blood clots known as venous thrombosis. Even trying to counterbalance hours of TV watching through adequate exercise is not effective warn researchers., Hjesw TswK0

Jymmin: How a combination of exercise and music helps us feel less pain

Pain is essential for survival. However, it could also slow rehabilitation, or could become a distinct disorder. How strongly we feel it depends on our individual pain threshold. Scientists have discovered that this threshold can be increased by a new fitness method called Jymmin. It combines working out on gym machines with free musical improvisation -- and makes us less sensitive towards physical discomfort.,  kKn bYkiM4

Moderate and severe exacerbations accelerate physical activity decline in COPD patients

A new study shows that both moderate and severe exacerbations in COPD patients are associated with a decline in their physical activity level. Researchers observed that the acute drop in physical activity during a COPD exacerbation has an important and lasting effect., Fe21C5gfYeU

New microfluidic devices help athletes and enhance physical rehab

A new wearable system measures sweat and sweat biomarkers. It is a soft, flexible device that measures the bodiesā€™ response to exercise., UgV9K9ugNbc

Poor fitness linked to weaker brain fiber, higher dementia risk

Scientists have more evidence that exercise improves brain health and could be a lifesaving ingredient that prevents Alzheimer's disease., UQUUsEqW0NA

Climb stairs to lower blood pressure and strengthen leg muscles

If you don't have the time or money for aerobic and resistance training, why not try climbing the stairs? A new study demonstrates that stair climbing not only lowers blood pressure but also builds leg strength, especially in postmenopausal women with estrogen deficiencies who are more susceptible to vascular and muscle problems., U3eXo2vKAQY

Running helps brain stave off effects of chronic stress

The study finds that running mitigates the negative impacts chronic stress has on the hippocampus, the part of the brain responsible for learning and memory., NlbkDyA54Dw

What is a 'normal' blood pressure response during exercise testing?

New data suggest that the guidelines used to evaluate an individual's peak blood pressure response during cardiopulmonary exercise testing, which were last updated in 1996 and help doctors screen for hypertension and cardiovascular disease, may need to be revised., qx5yD7uVIPk

PFASs, chemicals commonly found in environment, may interfere with body weight regulation

A class of chemicals used in many industrial and consumer products was linked with greater weight gain after dieting, particularly among women, according to a new study. The chemicals -- perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) -- have been linked with cancer, hormone disruption, immune dysfunction, high cholesterol, and obesity., 5dt405wKKLg

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